Founded in 2006, Emory Global Health Institute (EGHI) works with students, faculty, and partners to bring into focus the health challenges faced by individuals and underserved communities around the world.

Hospital in India

EGHI harnesses the power of a multidisciplinary approach to global health problems, cultivates the next generation of global health leaders, catalyzes evidence-based data into action, links global health stakeholders, and shares Emory’s scientific eminence with the world.

The world can only solve its global health problems by uniting learners and leaders from across disciplines for research, discourse, and partnerships that lead to innovative, equitable and community-driven solutions. That’s the kind of work we do every day at EGHI.

— REBECCA MARTIN, VICE PRESIDENT FOR GLOBAL HEALTH
DIRECTOR OF EMORY GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE

2O36 PRIORITIES FOR EMORY GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE

Campaign Priority

In 2036, Empowering Global Health Leaders

Leading global health in the world.

Today’s global health challenges require a variety of skills, approaches, and insights to develop creative and sustainable solutions. Most importantly, global health requires leadership. 2O36 will dedicate resources to securing an endowed directorship to lead EGHI at a pivotal time while providing perpetual funding for programs, research, and scholarship opportunities.

Your generosity will allow EGHI to further its mission and continue its multidisciplinary work with scholars from across Emory University and throughout the world. In partnership, our efforts focus on low- and middle-income countries with the highest burden of preventable disease, disability, and death, including urgent investments to understand and prevent child mortality.

Campaign Priority

In 2036, Resources for Groundbreaking Research

Faculty discuss ideas.

When it comes to advances in global health, time, energy, and brain power are key to identifying and understanding evolving challenges. Addressing them also requires funding. 2O36 will provide Emory faculty members with pilot funds to tackle pressing and growing global health needs. Pilot funds are essential for giving faculty a platform to pursue game-changing ideas before they are ready for national funding.

EGHI also offers Rapid Response Grants to faculty for urgent, short-term, and multidisciplinary global health research or programmatic work. This program allows faculty to receive, via an expedited process, up to $10,000 for grant funding.

Emory Global Health Institute Faculty Fellows is another prestigious EGHI program, bringing together faculty members from all Emory Schools with global health leaders from the Carter Center, the Task Force for Global Health, and Georgia Institute of Technology.

A MESSAGE FROM

Rebecca Martin

Vice President for Global Health
Director, Emory Global Health Institute
A video quote of Rebecca Martin
Campaign Priority

In 2036, Bridging Academia into Student-led Action

Students collaborate to provide solutions.

The more people from diverse backgrounds working together to solve global health problems, the better. Whether they have 40 years of professional experience or are 2 years into a pre-med program, EGHI understands this and offers global health programs that harness fresh ideas from young leaders in training. Our student enrichment opportunities include intramural and international case competitions, an annual hackathon, a global health photography contest, and the Field Scholars Awards Program.

Your support directly advances the work of Emory University and EGHI and our shared goal of turning academia into action by offering unparalleled professional development, programs, and support for Emory students, the next generation of global health leaders.

Campaign Priority

In 2036, Perspectives are Global

Doctors examine patient with microscope.

We can only help communities around the world if we have a solid understanding and appreciation of their cultures, needs, and barriers to health. 2O36 will invest in programs that promote cultural awareness and equity in global health. By funding projects that directly connect students with people from all walks of life, we can prepare them to become compassionate global health leaders who, as they work with and within communities to remove barriers and improve health outcomes, appreciate the significance of social determinants of health.

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